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, English Language Teachers and Students, Hua Hin Today has organised a competition for the students to write a small essay in English.

The Teacher as a Hero Essay - 647 Words - StudyMode

why are teachers heroes? | Yahoo Answers

My Hero Essay example - My Hero What is a hero

From time to time I bump into a colleague in the corridor and we have what I've come to think of as a Joon Lee fest. Joon Lee is one of the best students I've taught. He's endlessly curious, has read a small library's worth, seen every movie, and knows all about showbiz and entertainment. For a class of mine he wrote an essay using Nietzsche's Apollo and Dionysus to analyze the pop group The Supremes. A trite, cultural-studies bonbon? Not at all. He said striking things about conceptions of race in America and about how they shape our ideas of beauty. When I talk with one of his other teachers, we run on about the general splendors of his work and presence. But what inevitably follows a JL fest is a mournful reprise about the divide that separates him and a few other remarkable students from their contemporaries. It's not that some aren't nearly as bright -- in terms of intellectual ability, my students are all that I could ask for. Instead, it's that Joon Lee has decided to follow his interests and let them make him into a singular and rather eccentric man; in his charming way, he doesn't mind being at odds with most anyone.

Identity - a Personal Essay - worksheets for teachers …

This database presents nearly 1,400 primary documents about the American South in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. Culled from the premier collections at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC), the database features ten major projects. Presenting the beginnings of the University of North Carolina, "The First Century of the First State University," offers "materials that document the creation and growth" of the University. "Oral Histories of th American South" has made 500 oral history interviews on the civil rights, environmental, industrial, and political history of the South. offers approximately 140 diaries, autobiographies, memoirs, travel accounts, and ex-slave narratives, and concentrates on women, blacks, workers, and American Indians. (See separate History Matters entry for more details.) "North American Slave Narratives" also furnishes about 250 texts. And the "Library of Southern Literature" makes available an additional 51 titles in Southern literature. "The Church in the Southern Black Community, Beginnings to 1920," traces "how Southern African Americans experienced and transformed Protestant Christianity into the central institution of community life." "The Southern Homefront, 1861-1865" documents "non-military aspects of Southern life during the Civil War." “The North Carolina Experience, Beginnings to 1940” provides approximately 575 histories, descriptive accounts, institutional reports, works of fiction, images, oral histories, and songs. “North Carolinians and the Great War” offers approximately 170 documents on effects of World War I and its legacy. Finally, "True and Candid Compositions: The Lives and Writings of Antebellum Students at the University of North Carolina" analyzes 121 documents written by students attending the University of North Carolina. The projects are accompanied by essays from the , and are searchable by author, keyword, and title. They reflect a larger effort, begun in 1995, to digitize the Southern collections at UNC.

Actually you just proved the reason the person wrote the article and why teachers no longer have respect of parents and tax payers!!!
27/10/2009 · i am doing an essay, and i need three solid reasons on why teachers are heroes. i need help fast!!!! thanks!!

Celebrating Everyday Teacher Heroes

I wish it were that easy but it is not. The losers are the kids. Because of all that is added to teachers’ plates, time is not left to focus on planning and implementing curriculum and instruction for the kids. This is a sad time for American education. After 35 years in the classroom and at age 58 I decided I needed to retire. I never thought I’d retire at my age but I could no longer handle the daily stress of handling paperwork, logging on and creating another password for a new program or test, attending another meaningless meeting, creating another new plan for a student who didn’t want to follow expectations, and replying to parents multiple emails about why their student isn’t successful in the classroom. I loved teaching and the kids. I think I was pretty good at it but I was exhausted at the end of every day and I could never get caught up on what I thought needed to get done. I worked later and almost every Sunday afternoon for 2-4 hours so I could be ready for the next week. I’m now enjoying every day as a Saturday. Thank you to all the teachers still in the trenches. Keep fighting the good fight!

Student Essay - Who is Your Hero?

Teens Answer the Question, "Who Is Your Hero?" ..

Developed by the Film Study Center at Harvard University, this site is an experimental, interactive case study that explores the remarkable 18th-century diary of midwife Martha Ballard. The site demonstrates how historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich pieced together the diary within a broader historical context to write the book and offers a behind-the-scenes tour with filmmaker Laurie Kahn-Leavitt on the making of the film version, also called . The site offers two versions of the 1400-page diary, facsimile and transcribed full-text; the latter is searchable by keyword and date. An archive offers images of nearly 50 documents on such topics as Ballard's life, domestic life, law and justice, finance and commerce, geography and surveying, midwifery and birth, medical information, religion, and Maine history. It is searchable by document type, topic, author, and title. Also included are maps of North America (1795), Maine (1799), and Hallowell, Maine (1794); images of Augusta and Hallowell Maine; and a walking tour of Hallowell, Maine. A timeline traces Maine's history from the first attempt to settle the coastline in 1607, through Ballard's lifetime (1735-1812), to the 1997 release of the film . Interactive exercises offer students the opportunity to transcribe and "decode" portions of the diary, and a "Magic Lens" makes it appear as if Ballard's handwriting is instantly transcribed. A drop-down menu offers suggestions on ways to use the site for conducting research on genealogy, midwifery and herbal medicine, and diaries, as well as for using primary sources. Of particular interest is a section on teaching with this Website, which includes 15 ideas for classroom activities and suggestions on how to customize the activities for different grade levels, as well as links to the teacher guides developed for the PBS film. 2 "Doing History" exercises allow visitors to build a story around Ballard's notes about 2 controversies. The "On Your Own" section helps "beginning historians" organize and conduct research with ten 500- to 750-word essays describing the stages of a research project and offering step-by-step instructions on cultivating such research skills as reading 18th-century writing, reading probate records, searching for deeds, and exploring graveyards. There are also links to 5 additional Websites with further how-to information, a bibliography of over 125 related scholarly works, and 50 related websites. This rich site provides students and teachers with an ideal case study of the work involved in "piecing together the past."

Teachers: Unsung Heroes of the World Essay - 4188 …

Free Essay: As for Einstein, he’s a genius

This collection of approximately 65,000 documents written by or to George Washington is the largest collection of original Washington documents in the world. It includes "correspondence, letterbooks, commonplace books, diaries, journals, financial account books, military records, reports, and notes accumulated by Washington from 1741 through 1799." The site is searchable by keyword, and the range of documents make it an extremely rich source. Unfortunately, many of the documents are available only as page images--often with difficult to decipher handwriting--rather than as transcribed text. Transcripts, however, do exist for all of the diary pages and for additional selected documents. The site includes a number of helpful features: a timeline with annotations to relevant documents; a 1,500-word essay on Washington's letterbooks; an essay entitled "Creating the American Nation," with annotations on eight selected documents spanning Washington's lifetime; a 8,500-word essay on his diaries; an 11,500-word essay on the publication history of Washington's papers; and a 4,500-word essay on Washington's career as a surveyor and mapmaker. "Because of the wide range of Washington's interests, activities, and correspondents, which include ordinary citizens as well as celebrated figures, his papers are a rich source for almost every aspect of colonial and early American history."